Thursday, January 16, 2020

Book 216: Stiff



"Cadavers are our superheroes. They brave fire without flinching, withstand falls from tall buildings and head-on car crashes into walls. You can fire a gun at them or run a speedboat over their legs, and it will not faze them. Their heads can be removed with no deleterious effect. They can be in six places at once. I take the Superhuman point of view. What a shame to waste these powers, to not use them for the betterment of humankind."

Dates read: March 13-17, 2018

Rating: 8/10

I feel like one of the formative moments in realizing you're an adult is when you talk to your parents about what they want to happen to them when they die. First of all, realizing your parents are going to die (assuming you're fortunate enough to make it to adulthood without losing one or both of them) is something that's hard to actually wrap your mind around. Obviously you know they and everyone will eventually go, we all do, but thinking about it literally happening is upsetting. And then you start thinking about what to do with your own body after you're done using it and it gets really tricky to deal with.

It takes a skilled hand to write about death and bodies without being either so respectful as to be boring or just morbid. Luckily, Mary Roach has just such a hand and her book, Stiff, is an interesting and wide-ranging look at what happens to us when we die. Well, no one really knows what happens to the soul/spirit/whatever it is that animates us (she does devote a chapter to this, which she develops into a book in its own right, Spook), but our bodies. There's the usual burial/cremation, but Roach is more interested in the options we don't usually consider: donating one's body to science for medical students to practice anatomy on, chemical cremation, even allowing for the use of one's body in automobile crash testing (the dummies aren't nearly realistic enough). Some people even want to be composted. It turns out there are a lot of things your body can get up to!

Death may be a part of life, but it's still a part of life that there are a lot of deep, unprocessed feelings about. This book only works because of the way Roach just nails the tone: there's a deep undercurrent of honest curiosity that's present as she explores her subject. She recounts her own experience sitting with her mother's body after her death and how it made her feel, and doesn't forget that the bodies she sees in her explorations were once someone else's loved one too. She's honest about the ugly side of things...to the point where I found one of the chapters, about using bodies to do research about how the body decomposes under various scenarios (to help law enforcement and pathologists/coroners better estimate how long bodies have been in the elements after death) a little icky. But it never feels gratuitous. She doesn't say something irreverent or gross just for the shock factor. If you've ever wondered what happens to the outside of you when you die, or if you're curious now that you've thought about it, this is an intriguing book and I highly recommend it.

One year ago, I was reading: Say Nothing (review to come)

Two years ago, I was reading: Ghost Wars

Three years ago, I was reading: The Wars of the Roses

Four years ago, I was reading: The Woman Who Would Be King

3 comments:

  1. I read Grunt, one of Mary Roach’s other books, and thought it was excellent. I really want to read more of her stuff.

    Aj @ Read All The Things!

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    1. I just really enjoy her narrative voice! Her curiosity and open-mindedness shine through. I'm definitely planning to pick up more of her work!

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  2. I absolutely loved this book, as well as one of Roach's other similar focus topics, "Spook," which details various forms of ghost-related phenomena!

    Also, if you enjoyed this one, I'd really recommend "The Smoke Gets In Your Eyes: Lessons from the Crematorium" by Caitlin Doughty!

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