Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Books That Have Been On Your Shelf (Or TBR) From Before You Started Blogging That You STILL Haven't Read Yet

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly linkup of book bloggers hosted by The Broke and The BookishThere are LOTS. Like, a couple hundred lots (one of the reasons I started blogging was to hold myself accountable for actually reading all these). So, I'm just going to list the next ten books (excluding ARCs, all of which I've gotten after I started blogging) that I'm scheduled to read. Yes, I have a reading schedule, and spreadsheets, and the whole deal. I'm a nerd like that.



Bel Canto: I actually had to Google the plot synopsis, because I didn't honestly know anything about it. I'd just heard good things about the author, Ann Patchett, and the book for so long that I grabbed a secondhand copy and I'm looking forward to reading it!

Inamorata: This was one I scored from the Kindle First program quite some time ago. Reviews indicate that the writing is very good, but the rest of it not so much. Sometimes solid writing can salvage an otherwise mediocre book for me, so we'll see.

Life Itself: I love movies (I used to watch a lot more of them before I started reading so much all the time) and whenever I see an older one, the first thing I do afterwards is go track down Roger Ebert's review. He was so good at critiquing movies without being mean-spirited...unless, of course, they deserved his disdain, and then he let it rip. But his wit and insight made him a pleasure to read, and this is the biography he wrote as he was dying.

The Bridge of San Luis Ray: I like to read prizewinners, and this won a Pulitzer in 1928. It's a fairly brief novel so I should be able to read it pretty quickly, which is always a bonus.

The Other Side of the River: I'm pretty sure I found this on a list of best non-fiction reads set in each state (Nevada's was Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, of course, which I could not be less interested in). This takes place on the west side of Michigan, where two towns divided by a river are also divided by race and class. When a young man dies and is found in the river, the tension between the two communities escalates dramatically.

The Professor and the Madman: Like any good book nerd, words are my jam (my favorite has long been "effervescent" but I could put together a top ten list without much trouble). This book is about the making of the Oxford English Dictionary and apparently is being made into a movie!

David and Goliath: I've somehow never read Malcolm Gladwell before but my husband got a copy of this book, so I figure it's as good a place to start as any!

A History of the World in Six Glasses: Beverages are an important part of cultural experience, and Tom Standage's book uses beer, wine, liquor, coffee, tea, and cola to tell the story of humanity from the Stone Age to today.

The Circle: I've never read David Eggers before either, and this book about an internet company that grows to emcompass more and more parts of the lives of its users feels super relevant to today. This was a bit of a flop, and I'm curious whether I think that's fair.

Sophie's Choice: I've seen the movie so I'm spoiled on the "twist", but I'm interested to read the source material. The book isn't always better than the movie, so we'll see how this one actually works.

12 comments

  1. Oh I'd love to read Sophie's Choice someday! I must admit I've also never seen the movie (*shame*), but at least that means I can go into the book without spoilers :)

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    1. The movie is heartbreaking and done really really well (Meryl Streep is incredible), so if you want to see it afterwards I'd totally recommend it!

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  2. I just finished The Professor and the Madman a few months back, and I was not impressed, which was disheartening, because I went into it with high hopes. I haven't read any David Eggers yet, but Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius made my top ten list this week, so here's hoping. :)

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    1. Drat! I picked it up for like $3 on my Kindle, so if it's not awesome I can deal. I have a copy of Heartbreaking, too, but The Circle is first on my TBR for Eggers!

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  3. You have a great selection of books here.

    I've read only Life Itself (I'd pass) and The Bridge of San Luis Rey which is worth the read.

    Happy reading!

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    1. I've heard mixed reviews on Life Itself, which totally bums me out but I think I'm going to read it anyways (I have a copy and I do enjoy his writing voice). Bridge of San Luis Rey I've heard is a quick read but a powerful one!

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  4. David and Goliath is one that I have had on my TBR list for some time! His books are always interesting.
    I have read The Professor and the Madman. It was interesting, though parts were a little weird. It is still an interesting bit of history though.

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    1. I'm interested to read my first Gladwell! My husband listens to his podcast and loves it.

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  5. I really enjoyed David & Goliath...and kind of love most anything Gladwell! However, I was underwhelmed by Bel Canto, but I loved Patchett's State of Wonder. And am planning to read her new one coming in Sept, Commonwealth.

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    1. If I don't have luck with Bel Canto, I'll have to check out State of Wonder then! Thanks for the rec!

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  6. I really really really want to read David and Goliat too. A friend of mine gave it a 5 star rating on Goodreads and so far it's never happened that she has loved something that I didn't so I just know it will be a winner :)

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    1. Gladwell is such a popular author, I'm really looking forward to finally reading one of his books and (hopefully) finding out what all the fuss is about!

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